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I and My in Japanese - Watashi, Atashi, Boku, Ore

There are many ways a person may refer to themselves in Japanese. Hopefully this page can help you sort out the various ways. Ways currently covered include: watashi, watakushi, atashi, atakushi, boku, and ore. Below this you will find out how to say My in Japanese.

How to Say I in Japanese


Watashi / Watakushi

The most common way for people in Japan to say I is watashi. Watashi is the standard form of I and is used by both men and women of all ages. It is considered perfectly okay to use in formal situations, but if you need to be especially formal, you can choose to use a variation of watashi instead. By adding the syllable 'ku', you can create the word watakushi. Watakushi is considered very formal and as such, isn't used nearly as often as the standard watashi.

Kanji: 私 (Both watashi and watakushi share the same kanji.)
Hiragana: わたし (watashi), わたくし (watakushi)


Atashi / Atakushi

Similar to watashi is the word atashi (all that is missing is the leading 'w'). Atashi is generally used by younger girls or women trying to sound more feminine or cute. Though atashi is an informal way for females to refer to themselves, it, like watashi, also has a more formal variation. By adding 'ku', atashi becomes the more formal equivalent - atakushi.

Hiragana: あたし (atashi), あたくし (atakushi)


Boku

An informal way for males to refer to themselves is boku. Boku is generally used by boys and young men, but its usage has recently made its way into the vocabulary of some young girls as well.

Kanji: 僕
Hiragana: ぼく


Ore

An informal and sometimes even rude or vulgar way of saying I is ore. This is a distinctly masculine form of the word and is typically used by men or boys trying to sound tough. It is considered to be very informal.

Kanji: 俺
Hiragana: おれ


How to Say My in Japanese

Saying my in Japanese is incredibly easy once you know how to say I. Simply take your chosen word for I and add no.

Watashi no / Watakushi no
Atashi no / Atakushi no
Boku no
Ore no


Example Usage:

Watashi no enpitsu desu – This is my pencil
Atashi no tomodachi desu – This is my friend
Boku no inu desu – This is my dog
Ore no kuruma desu – This is my car

Leave a Comment

If you found any errors in our translations, let us know in the comments below! Looking for a specific translation relating to the theme of this page? Free free to ask for one in the comment section as well. Otherwise, just let us know what's on your mind!

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The Fine Print

The Japanese to English Dictionary featured at the Chromlea Language Tutor may contain some errors in the Japanese language. It is to be seen with a grain of salt, as all the content is from actual user submissions and not checked for grammatical / spelling accuracy (though we do correct our content as we are informed of errors). We wish you the best with your learning Japanese and hope you can find this site helpful in your Japanese language study.